What makes a good locksmith?

I’m often asked, “How did you become a locksmith?” “How long have you been doing it for?” And “Do you need any qualifications to be a locksmith?”   These three questions can be put together into one broad one. What makes a good locksmith?   Firstly A “good” locksmith is only as good as there last job. If they complete 10 jobs to an excellent standard and the 11th job is completed very badly they are a bad locksmith.   In my experience it takes 100 jobs to get a good reputation and 1 bad job to get a bad reputation. So… Consistency. This is one of the first things that make a good locksmith.  Always finishing the job to a high standard. Even if it ends up costing you money. Customer satisfaction is key!   So back to the three questions. How did you become a locksmith? For me I was educated in the trade by a family member. But others learn on a course. But just like driving a car, you don’t truly learn till you’re out there on your own trying to do the job. The lock out in the dark and rain at 3am springs to mind. There is no one to call for support and you have to crack on and get the job done!   So the “how” isn’t as important as you may think. Anybody with common sense can pick up the very basics in a few weeks but it takes a lot of jobs to become a locksmith.   How long have you been doing it for? I’ve been just locksmithing for...

Are your Locks up to standard?

Did you know that if you had the wrong locks on your door it could invalidate your contents insurance? Can you tell the difference between a mortise dead lock to a multi-point locking system? Or a British standard night latch to a standard night latch? The general rules are as follows Locks accepted by 99.99% of insurance companies are: 5 lever mortise dead lock/SASH lock Multi point locking system (normally with a min of 3 locking points) A British standard night latch Keyed bolts (one on the top part of the door one on the bottom of the door)Ok so you may have seen that little list on your insurance renewal but what does it all mean? Let me try to explain 5 lever mortise lock There are hundreds of different mortise locks available, but the most common are the 2 lever, 3 lever and 5 lever. Inside the lock case there are levers that all get aligned when you put the key in the lock and this allows the bolt to move across and open. 2 and 3 lever locks are more suited for internal doors. You can check your locks by looking at the side of the lock where the bolts comes out. It should have a number on there detailing the amount of levers it has. Multi point locks. These locks are the ones that appear in the UPVC doors and composite doors. If you’re not sure if you have this type of lock, open your door and look down the side of the door. If you can see a metal strip down the door with...